Continuing Learning Japanese

Canadian Association for Japanese Language Education (CAJLE)
The Japan Foundation, Toronto

Japanese is taught at several secondary schools in Toronto and its surrounding areas. Yet, it appears that teachers do not know much about the other institutions, courses or programmes. This lack of understanding can sometimes be found even within the same institution. We believe that it is very important and necessary for teachers to know what their current students have previously studied and in what type of environment that education took place. Similarly, it is important to be informed of the available learning opportunities for students who wish to continue studying Japanese.  We believe it is essential for teachers to build a strong and active network that enables them to communicate with one another. Since December 2009, the the Canadian Association for Japanese Language Education (CAJLE) and the Japan Foundation, Toronto have been co-organizing events to build a good foundation for the articulation of Japanese language education.

 

Upcoming Events

  • Continuing Learning Japanese 24 (4.22.2017)

In the 24th event of the series, we would like to share activities targeting speaking proficiency, as a continuation of Continuing Learning Japanese 23.
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Past Events
  • Continuing Learning Japanese 23 (2.25.2017)

In the 23rd event of the series, we would like to share activities targeting speaking proficiency.
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  • Continuing Learning Japanese 22 (10.29.2016)

In the 22nd event of the series, we will have a showing of a video of an adult Japanese class (level 2) at Toronto Japanese Language School.
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  • Continuing Learning Japanese 21 (6.4.2016)

In the 21st event of the series, we will visit Toronto Japanese Language School, and observe one of three individual Japanese classes.
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  • Continuing Learning Japanese XX (2.20.2016)

For the 20th event of the series, we will have introductions on the classes at The Japan Foundation, Toronto. We also would like to review our previous meetings and would like to discuss about future gatherings.
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  • Continuing Learning Japanese XIX (5.02.2015)

In the 19th event of the series, we will visit Thornlea Secondary School, and observe one of Ms. Taiko Feldkamp’s high school credit Japanese classes.
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  • Continuing Learning Japanese XVIII (2.07.2015)

For the 18th event of this series, we will be following on from the topic of the 16th session. We will take this further and look at differences in focal points, differences in targeted students, and use in class; then through discussion we will further our understanding of the resources and at the same time learn the know how required to look at these resources from different angles.
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  • Continuing Learning Japanese XVII (12.03.2014)

In the seventeenth event of the series, we will visit A. Y. Jackson Secondary School (introduced in Continuing Learning Japanese 15), and observe one of Mr. Takada’s Japanese classes.
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  • Continuing Learning Japanese XVI (10.25.2014)

For the 16th event of this series, we will be focusing on teaching materials. Focusing on beginner level textbooks widely used in Toronto and its surrounding areas, participants will divide into small groups of two to three people and look at things such as the differences in the order of contents and how they are delivered, differences in focal points, what level of students and approximate hours of study are appropriate for each text, and perform research activities on classroom activities amongst others. The groups will then present their conclusions, and these may even go onto the website. The textbooks which we will be looking at include GENKI, Nakama, Minna no Nihongo, Mirai, Japanese for Busy People, and other textbooks in the Japan Foundation, Toronto’s collection.
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  • Continuing Learning Japanese XV (06.15.2014)

For the 15th event of this series, we will have an introduction on the Japanese language classes at Toronto’s A.Y. Jackson Secondary School, which offers Japanese as one of the elective subjects in their regular high school program. We will also have a panel discussion featuring four students/former students who began studying Japanese in high school and continued studying Japanese on through university, and we hope to share their voices.
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