Handcrafted Form: Tradition and Techniques

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October 19th, 2015

|Recurring Event (See all)

An event every week that begins at 12:00am on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, repeating until December 18th, 2015

Cost: Free

Details »    Click here to register »

Lamp with Edo-Karakami Washi paper

People in Japan are surrounded by utilitarian craft objects that have been brought into being and nurtured within their daily lives. By making the most of the raw materials of each craft—ceramics, textiles, metal work, lacquerware, wood and bamboo work, paper, etc.—and contriving to use the techniques appropriate to each, goods have been created that combine ease of use with beauty.

Following the industrial revolution in the West, Japan also saw the modernization of production during the Meiji era (1868-1912). Through the introduction of machines, most of the craft objects that until then had been made by hand were replaced by mass-produced, industrially manufactured goods. Alongside the mechanized production that occurred from the beginning of the Meiji era, however, production of hand-made craft objects continued on a smaller scale in independent, regional workshops throughout Japan. While this workshop system fostered superior artisans, among those workshop artisans it also gave rise to individualistic, idiosyncratic craft artists.

Traditional material and techniques, rooted in the climate and landscape of every region of Japan, produced both utilitarian craft objects made by the seasoned skills of artists and art works richly imbued with the creativity of craft artists. Artisans and artists have influenced each other. This mutual influence has contributed to the depth and high quality of Japanese craft as a whole.

This exhibition introduces hand crafted objects made from traditional materials with traditional techniques from all over Japan. Representative objects designated as “Traditional Craft Objects” under the Japanese government’s Traditional Manufactured Goods Law form the core of the exhibition, supplemented by works of craft artists.

Kazuko Todate
Chief Curator
Ibaraki Ceramic Art Museum

Handcrafted Form Exhibition Hours

Monday11:30 am - 6:30 pm EXTENDED HOURS
Tuesday11:30 am - 4:30 pm
Wednesday11:30 am - 4:30 pm
Thursday11:30 am - 6:30 pm EXTENDED HOURS
Friday11:30 am - 4:30 pm
Select Saturdays11:00 am - 4:00 pmOctober 17, 31 November 14, 28 December 12 January 9
CLOSEDOther Saturdays, Sundays;
November 11 (Remembrance Day);
Closed for Christmas and New Year: From December 19, 2015 to January 3, 2016

Details

Starts:
October 19th, 2015
Ends:
October 19th, 2015
Cost:
Free
Event Category:

Organizer

The Japan Foundation, Toronto & the Ted Rogers School of Management
Phone:
(416) 966-1600

Venue

The Japan Foundation, Toronto
2 Bloor St. East, 3rd Floor
Toronto, ON M4W 1A8
+ Google Map
Phone:
(416) 966-1600

Registration